Winter

Seasonality

Winter is known for preserves, but in the South there is plenty of fresh Winter produce. Celebrate the season with comfort foods and meals shared with loved ones around the table.

Winter

Seasonality

Winter is known for preserves, but in the South there is plenty of fresh Winter produce. Celebrate the season with comfort foods and meals shared with loved ones around the table.

Canned vegetables, jars of pickles and jams, and dried beans are a great way to keep your cold-weather meals tasty and nutritious. But don't discount fresh winter veggies. Many hearty greens and cruciferous vegetables are coming to their peak in December, January and February. Light frosts make produce like carrots, spinach, and cauliflower even sweeter.

Cruciferous

Cruciferous is king of the cold weather. The cruciferous, or brassica, family of vegetables includes many greens and root vegetables. These vegetables contain glucosinolates, which give spicy flavors and an occasionally pungent aroma.

BOK CHOY Bok choy, like many cabbages and leafy greens, is made almost entirely of water. However, bok choy is still nutrient dense- it's packed full of Vitamins A, C, & K, and is a good source of folate, B6, and calcium. Bok choy is fairly mild in flavor without the pungency of standard green cabbage. BRUSSELS SPROUTS Brussels sprouts are named for their fabled place of origin, near Belgium. At first glance, brussels sprouts look like bite-size cabbages, but they have a distinct flavor. They get a bad reputation, but are quite delicious (just don’t overcook them)! CABBAGE Cabbage’s large leaves make beautiful rolls. This leafy vegetable is very dense and tightly packed, so it’s a great choice for feeding a crowd. CAULIFLOWER Cauliflower has enjoyed a lot of recent popularity. Its white florets are tightly packed, and can be broken down to resemble a grain-free version of rice. It's also delicious roasted or made into a mash served alongside an animal protein. KOHLRABI Kohlrabi isn’t native to North America, but it grows wonderfully in the South. It cooks up just like turnips and radishes, and can be shredded to make a fun mid-winter slaw. SWISS CHARD The leafy green "Swiss Chard" is actually a variety of beet. Its leaves are wide and flat with a white, yellow or red rib. Chard is versatile- it can be sauteed, steamed, cooked into soups or eaten raw.

Greens

When thinking of greens the tendency might be to evoke springtime, but many greens can be happily harvested in the winter. Both hardy greens, like collards (a favorite for Southerners), and tender greens, like spinach, are available for winter harvest and help bring some of spring's vibrant green color to winter dishes.

COLLARD GREENS A combination of collard greens and black-eyed peas is a classic New Year's recipe in the South - meant to bring good luck and prosperity in the coming year. Collards are typically stewed down with pork, though vegetarians can use seasoned or smoked salts to achieve a similar flavor profile. SPINACH Spinach is a culinary favorite. It’s slightly grassy flavor lends balance to salads. Cooked, it’s a popular addition to pastas, quiches, soups and more. Although spinach leaves seem tender and delicate, they are an extremely hearty vegetable that is harvested happily in Southern winters.

Others

Winter is a good season for storage crops, or produce that does not need to be eaten right away once harvested. In fact, storage crops continue to cure and sweeten once picked, gaining flavor. Examples of storage crops are onions, winter squash, and potatoes. Alongside storage crops are some green winter vegetables, such as celery and carrots,.

CARROTS Carrot is one member of the "mirepoix" trio (carrot, celery, onion) that is the flavorful base for many culinary dishes. Carrots sweet, earthy flavor balances a number of dishes. And of course, raw carrots are a delicious snack! CELERY A watery green member of the parsely family grown for its thick stalks; eaten raw or cooked in stews and soups. Celery has a long fibrous stalk tapering into leaves. Celery is one member of the "mirepoix" trio (carrot, celery, onion) that is the flavorful base for many culinary dishes. GREEN ONIONS Green Onions (also known as scallions) have a long green stem with a small white bulb. They have a mild onion flavor that is concentrated in the bulb and can be used raw or cooked. SHALLOT Shallots are a small, sweet, and mild member of the onion family. Shallots can be used similarly to onions, sauteed or roasted early in the cooking process to layer in complexities of flavor, or they can be pickled, thinly shaved raw, or finely minced and used in salad dressings. WINTER SQUASH Thick-skinned squashes look as tough as can be, until you enjoy them slow-roasted or simmered in a soup. A little heat unlocks sweet flavors and a bit more flavor intensity than their summertime counterparts. Winter squashes are great sources of Vitamins A & C.

Seasonality Map

Seasonality

Map

Summer

Summer is the season for raw, cooling foods, refreshing salads, salsas and slaw.

Fall

Crisp produce abounds in the Fall with colors and flavors as vibrant as the changing leaves.

Winter

Winter is known for preserves, but in the South there is plenty of fresh Winter produce.

Spring

Spring brings us young, tender produce emerging from the winter soil with light, fresh flavors.

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