Spring

Seasonality

Spring brings us young, tender produce emerging from the winter soil with light, fresh flavors. Celebrate spring's freshness with pastas, quiches, and salads using the last of winter's greens.

Spring

Seasonality

Spring brings us young, tender produce emerging from the winter soil with light, fresh flavors. Celebrate spring's freshness with pastas, quiches, and salads using the last of winter's greens.

Spring in the south - time to shake off our winter hibernation and get outdoors. Right on cue, your local farmers markets begin to open up their doors after a seasonal hiatus. Keep an eye out for crisp asparagus, flavorful alliums, and the beginnings of juicy fruits like strawberries. Flavors in spring are fresh and light, taking a cue from the young, green plants emerging from the soil.

Alliums

Allium is a genus of flowering plants that includes many cultivated species, such as onion, garlic, scallion, shallot, leek, and chives, Many alliums are used as food plants, and in most cases, both the bulb and leaves are edible.

GREEN GARLIC Green garlic is a young garlic plant that usually has not yet formed bulbs. Green garlic has a milder and sweeter taste than regular garlic. RAMPS Ramps are an elusive, wild edible and Appalachian delicacy known for their bold, decadent flavor and strikingly small window for harvest. SPRING ONIONS Similar to a green onion or scallion, these springtime alliums have a mild onion taste. VIDALIA ONIONS A sweet variety of white onion that was developed in Vidalia, Georgia, and only grows in Georgia soil.

Fruits

Spring fruits are a hint of the sweet bounty that summer will bring and include stone fruits, like nectarines and plums, and sweet berries, such as strawberries.

NECTARINES Almost identical in genetic makeup to the peach, these fruits have a smooth — not fuzzy — skin, and tend to be a bit more fragrant. PLUMS These fruits have a fleshy sweet inside and glossy purple outside. We call them prunes when they’re sold as dried fruit. STRAWBERRIES The red gems have but a short season at the beginning of summer, so gather them quick once you see them at Market! Freeze any that you can’t finish for desserts and smoothies later in the year.

Legumes

Beans, peas, and even peanuts fall under the legume category. Legumes offer plenty of plant-based protein and fiber as well as other essential nutrients like iron, calcium, and B vitamins.

ENGLISH PEAS After peeling back their pod casing, you’ll find a row of sweet, crunchy gems that add brightness to soups, salads, and everything in between. Stock up and freeze extra peas if you don’t plan on enjoying them immediately - you’ll be happy you did after their brief season ends. SNOW PEAS Snow peas are eaten as an unripe, whole pod. They are similar to sugar snap peas but are flatter and have a thinner pod. Snow peas are a frequent ingredient in Asian cuisine, such as stir-fry dishes. SUGAR SNAP PEAS A cross between snow peas and garden peas, sweet, crunchy sugar snaps can be eaten whole in their pods.Sugar snap peas are a versatile pea and can be enjoyed either raw or cooked and add a bright, crunchy flavor to many dishes.

Other

Spring is full of colorful vegetables, especially of the green and red variety. Light green and pink hued fruits and vegetables blend in beautifully with the explosion of flowers brought on by Spring.

ASPARAGUS This veggie makes a brief, but much anticipated appearance during the spring - so don’t wait to pick some up next time you see the flashy green and purple stalks at the market! Did you know that asparagus takes about three years to grow from seed to harvest? BROCCOLINI Similar to broccoli, but with thinner stems and smaller florets. A hybrid of broccoli and kai-lan. RADISHES Radishes are crisp and peppery, perfect for salads or hors d'oeuvres. Their colors can range from red to white to striped. RHUBARB The reddish pink stalks are the only part of this versatile vegetable that are edible. In cooking, rhubarb stalks are usually cut and boiled in water and then often mixed with sugar and spices, creating jams and rhubarb sauce. Rhubarb is also used in pie fillings as well.

Seasonality Map

Seasonality

Map

Summer

Summer is the season for raw, cooling foods, refreshing salads, salsas and slaw.

Fall

Crisp produce abounds in the Fall with colors and flavors as vibrant as the changing leaves.

Winter

Winter is known for preserves, but in the South there is plenty of fresh Winter produce.

Spring

Spring brings us young, tender produce emerging from the winter soil with light, fresh flavors.

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